Clin Surg | Volume 1, Issue 1 | Research Article | Open Access

Toward Understanding Culture and Judgment in an Academic Surgical Department with Assessments using the Competing Values Framework and Hartman Value Profile: A Case Study

Vic Velanovich*, Michael A Harringto and David J Smith

Department of Surgery, University of South Florida, USA

*Correspondance to: Vic Velanovich 

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Abstract

Background: Understanding both the culture of an organization and its members’ judgment can enhance a leader’s ability to meet the organization’s goals. We were interested in whether “Organizational Cultural Assessment Instrument” (OCAI) and “Hartman Value Profile” (HVP) will provide insights into our prevailing culture and its members’ judgment capacity.Method: Faculty members of the Department of Surgery at the University of South Florida completed two instruments: The OCAI and HVP. The OCAI asked 6 questions in each of 4 domains assessing present and preferred culture of the member. The relative proportion of each domain ranges from 0 to 100. The domains are the “clan” culture, the “adhocracy” culture, the “market” culture, and the “hierarchy” culture. The respondent has to assess both the present state and their preferred state of their organization. The HVP measures judgment using two sets of lists of items that the individual must rank which lead to an assessment of intrinsic judgment, extrinsic judgment, and strategic judgment. Scores range from 0 (best) to 80+.Results: The OCAI mean scores for present state: Clan domain 15.6, Adhocracy domain 19.0, Market domain 38.2, and Hierarchy domain 25.7. The preferred state: Clan 31.3, Adhocracy 26.5; Market 24.3 and Hierarchy 17.6. The mean HVP work-side scores: Intrinsic 9, Extrinsic 11, and Strategic 17. There was also a wide range of responses.Conclusion: We interpret that the faculty members feel that the culture undervalues people and innovations and overvalues external competition and bureaucratic procedures, compared to how they would like the Department to be. It appears that the members have good judgment capacity for relationships and work capacity. These results have allowed us to reflect on the Department’s culture and members capabilities.

Keywords:

Academic surgery; Organizational culture; Personal judgment; Competing values framework; Hartmann value profile

Citation:

Velanovich V, Harringto MA, Smith DJ. Toward Understanding Culture and Judgment in an Academic Surgical Department with Assessments using the Competing Values Framework and Hartman Value Profile: A Case Study. Clin Surg. 2016; 1: 1264.

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